I Need a Break

Just to let everyone know, I think I need a break. I have things to say, but would benefit from reading more and clarifying ideas. Besides, I can’t conjure up the wherewithal to withstand any semantics right now or people on either side not being honest and devolving into apologetic routine instead of admitting reality, how things actually work, and problems that actually exist. See you soon.

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10 Responses to I Need a Break

  1. tap says:

    Well, i hope my posts here haven’t caused you much angst. I know you are just trying to discern what the right course of action would be for you spiritually. My main reason was posting was to encourage, as it were, and also if i could to meet arguments (that i think are usually dishonest)on the protestant side.
    My Advice: Read the Church fathers. Read the documents of the earliest christians, to know what they believed. Whether they believed in the real presence, the sacraments, veneration of Saints. That way you are not listening to modern arguments but something thats been written as early as the 2nd century

    Start with St. Irenaeus, book 3 of his against heresies. Links below (protestan site btw):
    –http://www.ccel.org/ccel/schaff/anf01.ix.iv.iii.html

    –http://www.ccel.org/ccel/schaff/anf01.ix.iv.iv.html

    –http://www.ccel.org/ccel/schaff/anf01.ix.iv.v.html

    –http://www.ccel.org/ccel/schaff/anf01.ix.iv.vi.html

    I hope this does not add more to your frustration.

  2. Stacey says:

    tap,

    No, of course you’re fine! When I was talking about people getting into an apologetic routine, I was talking about myself as well. I’d like to step back and maintain perspective, make sure I’m being honest with myself. It’s hard to do when debates are flying back and forth, especially when you’re forming opinions on things. I also have a lot of reading to do and looking into ideas that have come up recently.

    I mainly put up my “on a break” post so nobody would think I was ignoring complicated theological comments, or that I’d forgotten my promise to write a post on Mary πŸ˜‰ Thanks for the links.

  3. Irenaeus says:

    Not a bad idea. I’ve found the blogosphere to be hostile and ugly (and yet addictive):)

    If would want to consider it, you could always post as a guest at my blog – since it’s private and secret, it’s a friendly audience.

  4. Rhology says:

    I wish you good times of rest. Everyone needs it!

  5. Lenetta says:

    Stacey, I am a Catholic married to a good solid Lutheran (MO Synod) Nebraskan corn farmer. I really appreciated your posts on Luther – one thing that deeply disturbs me is that the Lutheran church rejects some of Luther’s beliefs. I’ve not done proper research on it, but it sure sticks in my head. (We believe he was right on such-and-such, but we believe WE’RE right on thus-and-so . . . eek.)

    If I may, I’d like to point you to http://www.conversiondiary.com. Jen is a former athiest, now Catholic, and she is able to put docterine and all kinds of other stuff into words like nobody’s business. (in a good way, of course.)

    I’d also like to share a book I’ve just finished reading – Karl Keating’s Catholicism and Fundamentalism. As a cradle Catholic in a not-terribly-evangelical area, I never had a clue people believed such things about Catholics! I thought he also did a good job explaining Catholic beliefs and fundamentalists’ misconceptions, plus his Food For The Mind (aka recommended reading) chapter is amazing.

    I also enjoyed Born Fundamentalist Born Again Catholic by David Currie. His story seemed to have more “data”, while Rome Sweet Home is more personal. (Love the Hahns, though. I met one of their sons a few months ago!)

    Also, if you happen to have cable or satellite TV, I’ve found that EWTN isn’t nearly as weird as I thought it might be. The Journey Home might provide you with some different points of view on how others overcame “hurdles” to the church such as Mary.

    Finally, I just finished reading A Mother’s Rule of Life by Holly Pierlot. It is written for Catholic mothers struggling with their vocation of motherhood – which I certainly don’t mean to say that you are! What I love about it is the way it connected my Catholic faith with my everyday struggles and provides means to help me find God in the laundry piles, so to speak.

    Not that you asked for such recommendations . . . if nothing else, I do hope you’ll check out Conversion Diary.

    In reading through the comments on your previous posts, I felt exhausted by the debate, much as I feel exhausted debating with my hubs. Personally, I’d like to see you keep posting but maybe close the comments if you need to? I think blogs like this are very helpful to those who are searching, but the fur sure can fly on both sides sometimes.

    Many blessings to you as you make your way on this journey!

  6. Stacey says:

    Lenneta,

    It’s good to hear from you πŸ™‚ I love recommendations and I’m an avid reader. But my list has grown so long right now, I fear it will take at least five years to get through it!

    one thing that deeply disturbs me is that the Lutheran church rejects some of Luther’s beliefs.

    Most of my reading has been about Luther and the foundations of the Reformation, so I don’t know where Lutherans differ in their beliefs from him. That is weird. I should grab my mom’s Lutheran catechism and check it out.

    What I love about it is the way it connected my Catholic faith with my everyday struggles and provides means to help me find God in the laundry piles, so to speak.

    I love this about the Catholic faith. The “Ordinary Work, Extraordinary grace” (I’m a fan of the Hahn’s too). My son’s middle name is Josemaria. It’s such a stark contrast to the Word of Faith “abounding in riches” gospel.

    In reading through the comments on your previous posts, I felt exhausted by the debate, much as I feel exhausted debating with my hubs.

    Yes. I think that’s why I feel the need for a break, and I’m sure I’ll take more in the future. Anything to keep me honest and keep blogging from overshadowing my existence. It just proves that when you handle the sacred, you must handle it carefully, because this stuff matters to people and in life.

    Be patient with your husband. A steady witness does marvelous things. I think what I appreciate about my husband most is that even now, he is careful to answer all my questions but not push me in any way. He never expected that I would convert, and just started gawking at me when I sounded more and more Catholic as I came to understand things better.

  7. Lenetta says:

    Your pile to read sounds about like mine! :>) There just aren't enough hours in the day, and I spend too many of them staring at this screen, I'm afraid.

    Anyway. I felt I'd better leave you one more link – here is what I was referring to regarding the Lutheran church rejecting some of Luther's views.

    http://www.utexas.edu/cola/
    depts/philosophy/faculty/koons/
    case_for_catholicism.pdf

    Sorry, I had to put in a couple of hard returns so it'd fit. The passage to which I'm referring is at the bottom of page 61, through page 62.

    I appreciate your reminder to be patient with my husband. Actually, his faith is so strong that I don't expect he'll ever convert. We live in his hometown, and he attends church where his parents and aunts and uncles go, where he was baptized and confirmed, etc. That's a strong bond. He also just wrapped up a term as an elder in his church.

    I have begun quietly praying for his conversion, though, because God is the only one who can bring it about in a joyful manner – and I would never wish him to convert in any other way. By the way, I printed the above document, read it myself over a few weeks, and offered it to him. He'll get to it eventually, I'm sure. :>)

    We really struggled with where to baptize our daughter. In fact, we had such a row about it while I was still pregnant that I couldn't even talk or think about it without bursting into tears, and I'm not so sure that it didn't contribute somewhat to a stalled labor. (Ah, the mind of a hormonal, pregnant woman is a very strong thing!) We ended up baptizing her at his church, with my Catholic brother and SIL as godparents. It was only by God's grace and the prayers of many that I was able to celebrate the day with a joyful heart.

    My exhaustion with his and my debates come about because I feel backed into a corner, and can't quickly come up with the words to respond. I'm quite thin-skinned, to his dismay (see bursting into tears above). I read recently that so many of the attacks on the Catholic church are one sentence – "well, you worship Mary!" Yet they take quite a bit of time (or paragraphs or even pages, in writing) to properly and thoroughly address. That's tough.

    One very good thing about my hubs – I've strengthened my faith considerably. Had I married a nice Catholic boy and raised a nice Catholic family, I might not have learned of the beautiful depth to my faith. And I've such a long way to go yet in learning, too!

  8. Stacey says:

    Lenetta,

    God is the only one who can bring it about in a joyful manner

    That he can. He did for me, which is surprising, since I can be rather stubborn!

    Had I married a nice Catholic boy and raised a nice Catholic family, I might not have learned of the beautiful depth to my faith.

    I’m so glad to hear that! I’ve come to see the Catholic Church as very beautiful as well. It’s so nice to hear from people who feel the same instead of the many that hate her. Do you have a good support system? It must be rather hard being surrounded by opposition.

  9. Lenetta says:

    I wish I had more of a local support system, but it’s getting better. My parish is extremely small – perhaps 40 people attend? I’ve never counted. They aren’t unfriendly, but it’s taken a while for me to feel a part of things.

    I need to join the altar society, that would help. I also participated in a bible study last fall that was awesome. (Edward Sri – he does an incredible job of explaining how things would have sounded to a first century Jew. But I read some great blogs (probably too many) and have tried to “look within” a bit more.

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